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Sodium Selenate as a Disease Modifying Treatment for Probable Behavioural Variant Front-temporal Dementia

Description 
Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is generally due to abnormalities either in a protein called tau (45%) or a protein called TDP-43 (45%). In both types of FTD the protein aggregates into ‘clumps’ that block brain cell function. There are currently no treatments for either type of FTD. Our group has successfully run several research trials using a drug called sodium selenate that prevents the aggregation of tau in brain cells. We have shown that sodium selenate is safe in humans and that it has measurable benefits in Alzheimers disease (a different type of dementia to FTD). This study is an early phase study in which participants with FTD receive sodium selenate and are followed over 12 months. During this period standardised measurements of safety, cognition and neuroimaging (MRI, PET) will be undertaken.
Essential criteria: 
Minimum entry requirements can be found here: https://www.monash.edu/admissions/entry-requirements/minimum
Keywords 
Frontotemporal dementia, Tau, clinical trial, sodium selenate, physiology, pharmacology, microbiology, anatomy, developmental biology, molecular biology, biochemistry, immunology, human pathology, clinical, neuroscience, physiology, pharmacology, microbiology, anatomy, developmental biology, molecular biology, biochemistry, immunology, human pathology, clinical, neuroscience
School 
Central Clinical School » Neuroscience
Available options 
PhD/Doctorate
Masters by research
Honours
BMedSc(Hons)
Graduate Diploma
Short projects
Time commitment 
Full-time
Part-time
Top-up scholarship funding available 
No
Physical location 
Alfred Research Alliance
Co-supervisors 
Dr 
Lucy Viviash
Dr 
Charles Malpas
Prof 
Dennis Velakoulis
(External)

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