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Is injecting drug use a risk factor for drug-resistance bloodstream infections? A nested case-control study

Description 
People who inject drugs (PWIDs) are at increased risk of invasive bacterial infections, including Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection. Injecting drug use has traditionally been considered to be a risk factor for drug resistant S. aureus infection, i.e. methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infection. This assumption has important clinical implications, as changes antibiotics used to treat PWIDs when presenting to hospital with a severe infection. Yet there is scant Australian data to support injecting drug use as a risk factor for MRSA infection. We will use an existing dataset (the AGAR Sepsis program) augmented with additional data collection, to perform a nested case-control study to quantify the association between injecting drug use and methicillin resistance among patients with Staphylococcus aureus BSI.
Essential criteria: 
Minimum entry requirements can be found here: https://www.monash.edu/admissions/entry-requirements/minimum
Keywords 
People who inject drugs (PWIDs), bloodstream infection, antimicrobial resistance, infectious diseases, Staphylococcus aureus
Available options 
Honours
BMedSc(Hons)
Time commitment 
Full-time
Physical location 
Alfred Hospital
Co-supervisors 
Dr 
Adam Jenney

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